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Category: Process, Quality, and Capacity Investments

January 23, 2018
Under Six Minutes
The Tennessee Department of Children’s Services, the University of Chicago’s Departments of Medicine & Public Health Sciences, and the Center for State Child Welfare Data at Chapin Hall are field-testing computerized adaptive mental health tests (CAT-MH™) to diagnose and report on the mental health of young people in the child welfare system. ... Read more >

Today, public child welfare agencies are taking stock of their capacity for Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) and considering the investments they will make in order to build that capacity. How these CQI systems develop will vary from agency to agency depending on administrative structure, staffing patterns, available resources, and a host of other factors. They will all, however, be responsible for facilitating the same basic CQI process—a cycle of problem solving activities that requires the deliberate use of evidence. Given that shared responsibility, the child welfare field will benefit from a common vocabulary for describing what CQI is, the core principles on which CQI rests, and the critical role that evidence plays throughout the CQI process. In keeping with a century-long tradition of CQI that has guided improvement efforts in other fields, we put forth a common language for child welfare CQI in a new publication, Principles, Language, and Shared… Read more >

Care days is a strategic quantity that lies at the core of planning for, implementing, and monitoring foster care interventions, especially in the context of a Title IV-E waiver. This post summarizes Fred Wulczyn’s January 24, 2014 webinar “Care Days, Waivers, CQI, and Intervention Design.” ... Read more >
November 27, 2013
The Basic CQI Cycle
No matter the specific issue to which it is applied, improving outcomes for children requires agencies to work through the four basic phases of the CQI cycle: Plan, Do, Study, Act. In this post, we describe the cycle of CQI in a child welfare context and highlight the major activities that take place during each phase of the process.... Read more >

This is the last in a 4-part series that shows how to use the web tool to hone in on the needs of infants in foster care. In the last three posts, we used different parts of the web tool to learn how many infants are in our system in the first place, how long they spend in foster care, and what is unique about their placement and exit experience. When we left off, we had just learned that, among other things, infants in our sample county are more likely than older children to be placed in non-relative foster care, to exit to adoption, and when they reunify, to reunify within 90 days. What can we learn about what goes on behind the scenes in these cases that can give us more information about what might expedite permanency for infants in foster care? In this Recipe, I’ll show you how… Read more >

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